Sep
07

Pink Wines 09-06-14

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Boy, is there a lot to say about rose to really better understand what’s the dealio.  Good roses can be quite a revelation, not necessarily in terms of drama or profound-ness, but more about how they can add a whole ‘nother dimension to pairing with foods.  The challenge is finding the good ones.

In the Old Days, winemakers looked to improve their RED wines by bleeding off some juice & thereby maximizing the remaining juice to skin contact ratio.  With the bled off juice, the winemakers then sought to make something decent.   While this may make for better (?) red wines, it often made for mediocre PINK wines…..unless one was looking for a wine to just gulp & wash the food down with.

More recently, we thankfully have witnessed a fast growing number of light & fruity roses, where the grapes are harvested at lower sugar levels (& therefore less drama & lower potential alcohol levels), direct pressed in stainless steel tanks at cool temperatures.  These delightfully delicious, fruit driven roses are ideal for warm weather sipping with or without food.

Now, we are seeing the next generation of this style of pink wines—those grown in marine soils, which create minerality in the finished wines, in addition to being light & fruity.  This minerality creates ethereal-ness/interestingness in the wines, in addition to adding refreshingness & accentuating the wine’s vitality & liveliness.  From my point of view, these wines are also much more diverse at the dinner & lunch table AND with a wider range of foods.

We are now also seeing more & more masculine styled roses rising in availability & popularity. These versions are produced from more hearty, rustic red grape varieties, often grown in more rugged terrain & harvested at modest sugar levels, direct pressed & fermented at cool temperatures, BUT are just more masculine, hearty with more structure, drama, depth & hutzpah.  More reminiscent of Rhone Valley Tavel….which in my mind is more similar in profile to a lighter red wine of the old days.  One could readily pair these kind of roses to lighter meats AND even red meats.

Think about—a Thanksgiving feast with all of the fixings….& then there is the cranberry.  This has been a big revelation, which I think we will see more & more of, once the public acclimates to the bigger price tags (which are highly deserved in the finest examples).

So….that is the inspirations for this tasting.  A chance to taste 4 really good examples of what rose can be!!!

Yes, just another opportunity to learn!

00002012 Eric Chevalier Grolleau Rose

Every winegrowing seems to have a real shining star who emerges from the crowd & vanguards the region into the modern era.  The very best of them capitalize on modern techniques both in the vineyard & the winery to produce better wines than their neighbors, WITHOUT compromising a core of traditions, such as using indigenous grape varieties & never losing sight of purity of terroir & unique-ness.  In the Nantais region, the western most outreach of France’s Loire Valley, that man is Eric Chevalier.  “Éric sustainably farms twenty-five hectares of vines, producing wines of great character and finesse. The Nantais is a maritime climate, and the vineyards are not far from the Atlantic Ocean. Consequently, there is an interesting variety of sedimentary,  igneous, and metamorphic rocks, as this area once was ocean floor”.  Eric has a little over half a hectare of a grape variety, named Grolleau (20 year old vines), from which he produces a superb, interesting, ethereal PINK wine.  The wine is wild yeast fermented & aged on its lees in subterranean, glass lined cuvees for more texture & complexity.  Here is that wine!  Remarkably light, ethereal, salty, pure, precise AND most imporatant delicious!

2012 Maxime Francois Laurent Rose “Il Fait Tres Soif”  0003

Domaine Gramenon & its winemaker Maxime Francois Laurent is certainly that standout young phenom leading the charge in France’s southern Rhone Valley.  His style of wine is a distinct move away from the bigger, burly, brooding wines the southern Rhone has been known for, for at least since the 1930’s.  More importantly he is part of that vanguard looking to be uber-sustainable & back to basics both in the vineyard & the winery, which is why he & his wines have garnered an almost “cult” like following.  Yes, these are really hard wines to get….& for good reason.  They do not merely champion organic farming, but they incorporate the concept of sustainability into their daily lives by growing their own food and raising their own animals. Though Michèle and Maxime continue to test the confines of the appellation, the cellars are unsurprisingly old-fashioned. The Laurents use gravity-fed cuves and age their wines in oak demi-muids and foudres. That they take such gutsy risks as bottling old-vine fruit with so little sulfur, without fining or filtration, only demonstrates the lengths they will go to in order to highlight the freshness, purity, and intoxicating aromas.  of their small, rare production.  In addition to his work at his family domaine, Gramenon, Maxime also produces a small of wine under his own namesake label, which are even harder to get than those of Gramenon.  Here is his rose—1/3 each of Syrah, Grenache & Cinsault (25 year old vines) grown in clay limestone soils, direct pressed, wild yeast fermented with NO malolactic.  Another example of his thirst of purity, sense of place deliciousness & authenticity.  This wine definitely smelled & tasted of the soil.  NO tooty fruitiness here!  BUT, still brimming with deliciousness.

00012012 Maxime Magnon Corbieres Rose “Metisse

The Maxime Magnon wines are some of the hardest for us to get.  Magnon is part of one of the most revolutionary wine movements in France should give him a justifiable swagger to his step.  He was fortunate to have purchased some prime parcels of old vines from abandoned plots and rents his cellar—a garagiste if ever there was one. He farms nine parcels over eleven hectares, with steep vineyards that reach high altitudes, and manages it all on his own. Maxime is part of the new wave of passionate viticulteurs who cultivate their vines with the utmost respect for nature and the soil.  He’s certified organic, but also incorporates biodynamic practices into his vineyard management. Most of Maxime’s vineyard land is comprised of schist and limestone subsoils in the sub-appellation Hautes Corbières, bordering Fitou to the South. This is incredibly tough terrain to farm in, as there is virtually no top-soil, just pure rock and garrigue.  His one rose is 30% each Cinsault & Grenache Noir & 20% each of Carignane & Grenache Blanc (80 years-average age).  The wine is wild yeast fermented (the Cinsault separately) in concrete & aged for 6 months in 6 to 9 year old barrels.  Yes, 1 case made its way to the Islands.  I think most tasters were taken back by the darker color.  It has a very unusual color, quite striking in fact.  This wine also has a quite exotic nose–stony, flinty, even peppery with strawberry in the finish.  I would say, this is a masculine, delicious rose….one I will remember for a long time.

 2013 Yves Leccia Rose  “Ile de Beaute”  0002

Yes, Corsican wines are really happening across the country with sommeliers. And, Corsica has been on my wine bucket list to visit for at least 20 years.  I have been warned however not to travel there alone.  Seems like the remote parts of the island is rugged & inhospitable in more ways than just the countryside itself.  Where Bordeaux, Burgundy & Champagne are regions producing wines of grandeur, class & sophistication, I would say Corsican wines tend to be more hearty, masculine in nature with lots of Old World character & spirit.  That’s not to say, they aren’t good…..just intriguingly different.  In France,  Leccia’s have often been referred to as the “Rolls-Royce” of Corsican wines, a reputation earned after nearly 30 years of making consistently elegant and sophisticated wines.  Raised in a small village in the heart of  Patrimonio, Yves worked alongside his father in the vines and cellar at the earliest age he could. The Leccias have been making wine from some of the finest terroirs of Patrimonio for countless generations, Yves decided to branch off on his own in 2004 and focus on the single terroir he felt was the top in Patrimonio. This terroir, “E Croce,” sits on a thin chalk soil above a thick bedrock of pure schist, facing the gulf of St. Florent.   This rose is 60% Niellucciu & 40% Grenache, direct pressed, wild yeast fermented & full of true Corsican character.   Wow! Unlike the previous 3 vintages I had tried in the past, the 2013 had elegance, refinement & ethereal minerality, which really caught me by surprise.  Kudos.

 

Categories : Rose, Wine, Wine Thoughts

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