Dec
02

Wines of Santorini, Greece Part Two

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This is Part Two of our visit to wineries on the Island of Santorini.

Domaine Sigalas–founded in 1991, Sigalas is certainly one of the most heralded in all of Greece.  Paris Sigalas is not only celebrated by the international press, but we found how highly revered he is within his country.  As I noted in an earlier post, we had not set up any winery appointments prior to traveling to Greece.  It was so serendipitous how things worked out for us on this trip, especially winery wise.  Yes, we visited a wine bar in Athens named Vintage & had a fabulous winetasting experience with their resident wine sommelier Effie Anastopoulou, a VERY knowledgeable, charming, welcoming, consummate wine professional.  After tasting several top notch Greek wines with her, she asked if we would be visiting any wineries during our stay in Greece, to which we replied, nothing scheduled yet.  But I said there were at least one winery I had in mind to see–Sigalas in Santorini.  Her eyes lit up & she beamed I used to work there!  She helped us to get an appointment there, a private wine tasting & an audience with Paris Sigalas himself.  Thank you so much Effie!  Sigalas not only produces some stellar wines, but they are always looking to do things better, which means continual experimentation & evaluation.  (They, for instance, train some of their vines along the lines of Burgundy–see picture— versus the traditional koulara style).  I view Sigalas as very scientific in its approach versus the more renegade charge of Hatzidakis.   The wines were therefore, quite pure, minerally, well crafted, stylish & classy.  There is no doubt his Assyrtiko white wine sets the standard for others to aspire to be.  What a great visit!

Hatzidakis–Haridimos Hatzidakis started his namesake wine project in 1996 when he took & worked a small half hectare parcel roughly located at 1200 feet in elevation.  This parcel had laid essentially fallow & unattended since 1956.  Currently the Hatzidakis winery organically farms more like 10 hectares in Pyrgos Kallistis, Megalochori, Akrotiri & Vourvoulos, ranging in elevation from 100 feet up to 1200.  Haridimos represented the New Age of winemaking in Greece, someone who thought & played “out of the box”, & was helping usher Greece, its winemaking & resulting wines into a new era.  It was really sad that we lost him & his genius a couple of months ago.  Wines & Spirits magazine–“He was quiet, hard to draw out; the wines, on the other hand, weren’t shy at all: they were big, rich and concentrated. He raised them organically and vinified them without added yeasts or enzymes and a minimum of sulfur, often in old barrels. They were, on one hand, a throwback to older times; on the other, they spoke of an obsessive attention to farming and a commitment to low yields that could only happen today, when an international audience clamors for wines like these“.  Although, Hatzidakis was respected for championing indigenous Santorini grape varieties such as Aidani (white) & Mavrotragano (red).  It was, however, his work with the Assyrtiko (also indigenous), especially old vines & single vineyards (specifically the Mylos & Louros “Vignes Centenaires”  bottlings) which won his acclaim & his cult like following, internationally.  Assyrtiko de Mylos (the proper name) is very ripe, old vine Assyrtiko grapes of a single vineyard in the village of Pyrgos Kallistis–wild yeast fermented, 8 months on the lees & bottled unfiltered & manually with minimal sulfur.  Assyrtiko de Louros Vignes Centenaires” is 100% old vine Assyrtiko from the village of Pyrgos Kallistis at roughly 360 to 750 feet elevation.  The wine is also wild yeast fermented & spends 24 months on its lees in old barrels & is regarded as their crown jewel.  For me, I would also add that his Assyrtiko grappas (VERY limited) are worth seeking out.  It is really quite a blaze of glory in its category.  His former wife, Kostantina Chryssou, looks to keep the legacy going forward.

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