Jan
21

Salinity in wines?

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Growing up in this industry, I was always reminded of the French concept of terroir. They, in fact, have had centuries of finding those special parcels of land which manifested something special in the resulting wines. This concept spread throughout the wine world and many still refer to the concept of terroir. Somewhere along the line, tasters noted “minerality” in their tasting notes. The question has now become is minerality associated with terroir? Scientists are now publicly saying, there is NO conclusive proof that minerals, essences, etc, can be transmitted through the root system, through the plant and make their way into the grapes themselves. How can that be? (I really think that what some people call “minerality” may in fact not be soil driven). I would also say, there are in fact some wines which are VERY soil driven. A French Chablis is a perfect example. To take that a step further, I find there are wines which have salinity to them. I am sure some would question—from the soil or from the surroundings? Which brings us to this blind tasting opportunity. FOUR wines, served BLIND. We wanted to see if salinity can be detected in a finished wine.

2013 Bregeon “Gorges”–This is an absolute “must to try”, as there really is no other wine like it. This is the Muscadet grape variety–50 year old vines, grown in gabbro (a unique blue-green metamorphic rock) soils in close proximity to France’s Atlantic coast. VERY naturally minded both in the vineyard & winemaking, this special, gifted winemaker aged the wine for at least 2 years on the lees for texture, stability (without having to use so much sulfur) & real & “quiet” complexity.

2014 Lavantureux Chablis–100% Chardonnay grown in Kimmeridgian limestone soils in northern Burgundy, where there is NO ocean nearby. This is as naked, pure, absolutely riveting & food friendly as Chardonnay gets.  How does it get its salinity?

2016 Caravaglio Salina Bianco–The Caravaglio family have worked their land in the Aeolian Islands, off the coast of Sicily for over 500 years. They are in fact credited for first planting the Malvasia, Corinto Nero & other local grapes on both the Lipari & Salina islands. This 2016 Malvasia Secco combines a wonderful, exotic, perfume with minerality, structure & a touch of salinity.

2017 Sigalas Assyrtiko–Paris Sigalas is the iconic winemaking superstar of Greece. His home turf is in Oia, on the island of Santorini. This is a very unique winegrowing niche—flat, mercilessly sun baked vineyards with light weighted pumice soils, lack of much rainfall & gusting, often pounding coastal winds (certainly very warm during the day). The island has, in response to these severe conditions, developed a unique koulara style of training their vines to protect the grapes. This wine alone is worth coming to this tasting, it is that good–masculine, savory, profoundly stony, structured with salinity, especially in the after taste & a slight piquant bitterness in the finish.

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