Nov
09

Our Recent Trip to Italy–Part 1 Punta Crena–Varigotti

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Varigotti is a small town located in a niche of Liguria, not far from Finale Liguria.  It essentially has one main thoroughfare which runs through with narrow streets which turn off now & then & head towards the hills away from the picturesque beach which fronts the ocean there.  The sea air fills the air.

Punta Crena is a small family owned & operated winery just a few hundred feet off of the main road as one heads towards the hills.  This is where the family dwelling AND the winery is located.  Four siblings now run this venerable 500 year old estate–the eldest as winemaker ((Tommaso); one in charge of sales (Paolo), a sister in charge of admin (Anna) & one who helps all of the above (Nicola).  I found this family & their values as being seemingly timeless in how they go about their business.   It is truly a family run endeavor. 

We first took a short walk down the road fronting their winery complex.  Paolo showed us the 4 distinct soils which permeate their vineyards–quartzite, dolomitic limestone,a dark gray soil with a greenish edge & red clay.

Being they were harvesting & load after load of fruit continuously started rolling in, Paolo’s son, Filippo took us up into the hills to walk their vertically remote vineyards.  The vineyards were truly breathtaking & at high altitudes with some having incredible panoramic views of the coastline & others hidden in various nooks & crannies high up.  In each case, I felt like I was in a time warp & day dreamed of this family doing many of their tasks just as their forefathers had. 

I was also quite taken by the scents of the plethora of wild herbs & shrub which surround each of the small parcels of vines scattered here & there. 

The soils varied with each site as did the selected grape vines that were planted.  I was amazed at their plantings of different heritage grapes–Mataòssu, Lumassina (a cousin to Mataòssu); Vermentino & Pigato (which are somehow directly related to each other) for white wines.  On the red side, their focus on 3 indigenous grape varieties–Crovino, Rossese & a small amount of Barbarossa, each planted in various nooks & crannies scattered here & there in the hills directly above the winery & home.  During this family’s 500 year tenure here, they acquired various parcels as they became available, which at least partially explains how spread out their plantings are throughout the hillside.  I am & have been an avid fan of their Mataòssu bottlings, something they specialize in.  It combines the minerality from the soils with a perk of salinity, I imagine comes from the sea down below & merely 1200 meters away.

Visually, the Pigato grape variety is quite striking in its coloring.  They say the name derives from the word pighe, which means freckles in their dialect.  Tasting the ripen grape provided me with much insight into their finished wine.  The juice itself has very assertive flavors, a thicker viscosity & very pungent, piquant bitterness to the finish.  In comparison, Vermentino seems much rounder & juicy—somewhat more tame.  Lumassina seems almost neutral in comparison.  I find the finished wine to be the most pliable in terms of its affinity to foods, especially creating magic with the deep fried seafood fritti of the area. The spumante (sparkling) rendition is especially lively, completely refreshing for warm weather sipping & the lunch dining table.  Fermented in temperature controlled stainless steel, these wines are so tasty & vivacious right out of gates.  I would add to that, however, with 2 or 3 years of bottle age, the wines seem rounder & the terroir shines through more clearly.

On the red wine side, interestingly in the vineyards, the Crovino grape tasted the most structured, unyielding & tannic, in comparison to the Rossese & Barbarossa grapes.  Paolo was kind enough to open & share a magnum of his 2011 Cruvin “Colline Savonesi” (produced from the Corvino grape variety) at dinner on the first night.  I was quite taken with it, that’s for sure.  It was masculine,, earth laden, musky, with wild character of its wild birthplace  & so intriguingly savory in its core.   It certainly was a totally unexpected treat & gave me a completely new perspective on what this grape AND this wine could be.  Plus, I couldn’t believe this wine was fermented & aged in stainless (on its lees). 

This a great, truly memorable visit, one I had dreamed about for a long time.  Having said that, it turned out to be way more inspirational & invigorating than I could ever have imagined or hope for.  It really is about a family, their 500 year old home turf, their appreciation & respect for their land (we could readily see the disdain on Filippo’s face to bikers traversing the hills AND the homes of wealthier people starting to invade the area & build more elaborately) & how the family all jump in to do their “chores” in the running of this estate.  I love how they do so with such pride, appreciation & respect, even the young children.  It was something special to experience.  Thank you all.

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