Dec
09

French White Wine “Collectibles”

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2005 Coche Dury Puligny Montrachet “Les Enseignères”–there is no doubt that Coche Dury is at the very top of the “A” list of white Burgundies today.  While this domaine is based in Meursault, they also own 1/2 hectare of Les Enseignères vineyard in Puligny MontrachetWhen I first tasted the 1986 Coche Dury Corton Charlemagne, I was absolutely floored by its boldness, grandeur & magnificence.  It had presence, personality & mojo that was previously only seen from the Montrachet from Domiane de la Romanee-Conti.  Their style was certainly game changing & would inspire others to follow & emulate.  The 2005 is still surprisingly closed.  It certainly & almost vainly has the stuffing, but, even at 12 years in age, still has a LONG way to go in resolving itself.

2010 Château Haut Brion Blanc–one of our regular VINO guests likes to come in & blind taste me on one of his wines now & then.  On this night, it was this wine!  I was very thankful he shared such a wine.  The point of this exercise for him I am sure is to stump me or watch me struggle.  Ha! Ha!  For me, however, the exercise is to see if the wine was good or not…..how much would I pay….& think about what kind of foods I would consider pairing with it.  After all, how many times would someone have an opportunity like this, with such a wine?  This wine tasted VERY sophisticated, refined & high quality with a dollop of very expensive oak to it & I thought a distinct salinity.  Upon a quick 2 minute assessment (this is during service after all), Burgundy came to mind.  I would have paid, $125 to $150 a bottle online, but not $335 as is quoted today.  The wine as it turns out is 46% Semillon, 54% Sauvignon Blanc (not sure if there was a % of Sauvignon Vert in this vintage)….9 to 12 months in oak, 50% new.  The parcel is but 7.09 acres in size.  Yes, I was very thankful to try this wine.  The last Château Haut Brion Blanc I tried & purchased was I believe the 1986 for a winelist I was working with at the time.  I remembered being so inspired by a bottle of 1966 Laville Haut Brion in the early to mid 1980’s that we went on a Château Haut Brion Blanc buying binge of 5 vintages in pursuit of the wonderful perfume & regality I had experienced from that Laville Haut Brion.  It unfortunately never came even close.

2014 “Y”–another rarely seen white wine from Bordeaux.  The question is was this wine brought to assess quality or to stump fellow tasters in a blind tasting?  Again, my thought is always, I am so thankful for tasting such a wine, as opportunities like this don’t around too often.  Here is something I recently read “The dry white wine of d’Yquem. The chateau produces this wine in certain years when conditions permit. ‘Y’ comes from the same exceptional terroir and vines as Yquem’s famous sweet wines. It benefits from identical strict vinegrowing methods, but is harvested and produced differently. ‘Y’ is produced when the deliberate decision is made to pick certain plots of sauvignon blanc grapes at the beginning of the vintage and overripe Semillon grapes later on. This accounts for the small quantities and irregular production. There have been only 23 vintages of ‘Y’ since the first one in 1959!”  The 2014 is 75% Sauvignon Blanc & 25% Semillon, 7 g/l, residual sugar. 

2005 Raveneau Chablis Grand Cru “Les Clos”–despite being so VERY youthful, this wine on this night was really strutting its stuff that’s for sure.  This is without a doubt a real thoroughbred.  In the past, the Valmur grand cru vineyard was typically the Raveneau bottling I gravitated to each vintage.  I guess it is because of the remarkable ethereal, sophisticated, high pitched minerality & pedigree the wine typically offers.  This wine in comparison had more bass than treble….more stony & about grandeur.  Furthermore, this wine is WAY more open than my previous encounter, eventhough that was only 3 or so months ago.  What a wine, to say the least!

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