Apr
15

Food (more Asian in style) & Wine Ideas

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I grew up in this industry working with & around more classical fare.  With the advent, however, of fusing Asian & European cooking styles, it was a time to think out of the box in order to better understand what worked & what didn’t with this dynamic new culinary frontier.

What became more evident over time & much experimentation, was what Asian foods clashed with most was alcohol, heat & saltiness.   Essentially, alcohol became much more glaring; oak seemed bitter & bitterness seemed somehow even way more bitter.

We found that wines lighter, fresher, more fruity, less extracted & lower alcohol levels worked much better with a wider gamut of Asian influenced foods.

More recently, we have also been quite fascinated how aromatic grape varieties can add a whole ‘nother dimension to the pairings.  The challenge, of course, is finding really good ones.

Here are some examples of pairings we have recently done in Hiroshi Eurasion Tapas, which hopefully help you better understand what we mean.

Yukari Dusted Seared Scallop 1bwith lemongrass potato puree, squid ink croutons & chili air

WINE:  Domaine Skouras “Zoe”–to make this dish more wine friendly, Hiroshi Eurasion Tapas’ Chef John Iha added a potato puree for richness.  Furthermore, the infused lemongrass, not only heightened the dish itself, but also really connected with the wonderful, innate aromatics of this wine, which is a blend of Roditis & Moscholfilero (both indigenous grape varieties to Greece).  The Mediterranean minerality also worked well with the squid ink.  Another insight is how Chef John toned down the needed heat by making the chili pepper water into an “air” & therefore far less confrontational.

1cPastrami Cured Ahi “Nicoise” Salad with buttered fingerling potatoes, Mari Garden mini greens, Ho Farms tomatoes, long beans, marinated onions, sunnyside quail egg & adobo vinaigrette

WINE:  Hans Wirsching Scheurebe Dry–normally we would have looked to a PINK wine for this pairing, but on this occasion decided we needed more aromatics because of the adobo vinaigrette.  Yes, we marvel again & again how these aromatic style wines really can a whole ‘nother dimension to a pairing.  The challenge is finding the good ones.

Slow Cooked Mary’s Organic Chicken 1dwith oven roasted hamakua Alii mushrooms, forbidden black rice, galanghal-scallion pesto & natural jus

WINE:  Strub Riesling “Soil to Soul”–yet another aromatic wine, because of the fragrant, uplifting galanghal-scallion pesto.  We chose the Strub (from Germany’s Rheinhessen) because it is rounder, deeper yet still remarkably light & refreshing.

1eCrispy Kauai Shrimp with braised daikon, seaweed butter sauce & micro scallions

WINE:  Hofstatter Weissburgunder–yes, another aromatic, minerally white wine, this one from the hills of northeast Italy.  The wine’s minerality helped keep the palate fresh & alive while navigating the dish’s unusual (at least for wine pairing) components such as seaweed & daikon.

Seared Mari’s Garden Tilapia 1fwith aromatic tapioca sauce, hijiki tsukemono & caviar

WINE:  Birichino Malvasia Bianca–currently one of our absolute favorite “go to” wines when pairing with Asian inspired foods.  We seemingly use this wonderfully perfumed, lime edged white wine in so many of our pairings & am therefore continually re-amazed on every occasion at how wide of spectrum of foods this wine can readily work with.  By itself, I think the perfume may be too strong for most wine drinkers.  But then, I watch how it remarkably synergizes with aromatic sauces or uplifting herbs.  It really is an amazing food wine to say the least.  Pure genius.  Who would have thunk it?

1gOkinawan Soba “Mazeman” with grilled salmon, ikura, salmon skin, Thai basil, cilantro, calamansi & sesame-clam sauce

WINE:  CF “Euro-Asian” Riesling Medium Dry–Riesling works well with the oiliness of salmon.  Yes, there is lushness to its fruit & the rounder acidity when physiologically ripe.  We also love how minerality livens things up in the pairing too.  The CF Euro-Asian is produced for us by Weingut Gunderloch.  A special thanks to Fritz, Agnes & Johannes Hasselbach for making this dream come true.  The grapes come from hillside vines grown in red slate soils, which creates that stoniness/minerality, which is VERY different from the black/gray/blue soils of the Mosel, Saar, Ruwer river regions.  And, because this wine is medium dry, it has just enough sweetness to buttress the fruitiness for the pairing. FYI–there is a marked difference in this cuvee, beginning with the 2012 vintage.  Thankfully, the extract, bitterness & alcohol levels seem more moderate, despite the growing frequency of real sun drenched vintages.

Six layered Tonkatsu 1hwith roasted vegetables, potato-pancetta au gratin, pickled red cabbage & brandy-peppercorn sauce

WINE: Maxime Magnon “La Demarrante”–this is a fabulous dish from Chef John Iha, as he thinly sliced the pork & then reconstructed the many layers before panko-ing & deep frying.  To, however, make sure this dish was red wine friendly, Chef Iha, created a peppercorn-brandy sauce, instead of the VERY oriental slanted one he originally planned.  La Demarrante is a wonderfully delicious, refined Carignane & Cinsault blend from southern France around Corbieres.  Owner/winemaker Maxime Magnon studied with Jean Foillard, a true master/game changer in the Beaujolais Cru village of Morgon.  That influence can be seen by the carbonic maceration used in the making of this wine, making it more fruity, fresh without the typically rustic, often hard edges of many “country” red wines of the area.

1aOio Tempura-Unagi Donburi

WINE:  DR F Weins Prum Riesling Feinherb “Graacher Domprobst”–we chose a Feinherb for this pairing because of tiny bits of refreshing ginger & shiso used to accent the unagi, as well as the kabayaki drizzle which ties everything in the dish together.  Owner/winemaker Bert Selbach has such a fine touch & his resulting Riesling has such a magical, spellbinding purity, ethereal & aristocratic perfume & taste.  Furthermore, its precision & finely tuned sweet-sour teeter totter is exactly what this dish needed.

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