Dec
03

Corsican Wines–Part 6–Bonifacio

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Our visit to Corsica ended in Bonifacio, a city located in the southern tip of the island.

Bonifacio sits right on the sea & represented a very different look & feel to our Corsican experience. 

I was blown away on the drive into the city, as the surrounding cliffs are laden with limestone.  This was a very stark difference to all of the darker, granite based soils we witnessed throughout much of the drive traversing through the wild countryside & mountainous terrain prior.

The 2 main gathering areas of the city is down by the sea & its boat docks & the other up on the hill surrounding the citadel.

In the center, up on the hill, we walked around during the day, to check out all of the recommended restaurants & their menus, as we needed to plan dinners for our 2 nights there.  On our first night we ate at a cute, cozy, highly recommended eatery, but I must say, the over all experience was underwhelming.  As we walked back to our hotel, I would look in at the other restaurants of the area & then looked at their menu postings on their boards.  I can’t say, I was too excited.

The next morning, we headed out early to see Clos Canarelli, as theirs was by far the best wines of the area that we had tasted.  It was quite the visit. 

On the way home, we took a slight detour to Porto Vecchio, a seaport along the eastern coast.  There, we found a small, terrific, out of the way restaurant named A Cantinetta & had a terrific lunch.  It was memorable because it was good Corsican food–unpretentious, well prepared & definitely hit the spot.

Driving back to our hotel, I was quite full, since we seemingly ordered & try everything on the menu.

I remember thinking, in comparison, I didn’t relish eating at any of the restaurants we walked by up on the hill the night before.  The menus pretty much looked the same & geared more to the tourists.

We all agreed to instead eat in our hotel that night.  Hotel food?  On the last night?  We recalled that Yves Canarelli mentioned that our hotel served really good pasta.  He said the chef was really good, so we stayed in & went down to eat pasta that night. 

Well, Yves was right.  The was pasta was really good & well cooked.  It wasn’t Corsican by any means, but the food really hit the spot nonetheless.

The winelist was VERY small & was comprised of familiar, “standard” names we saw on many winelists during our visit.  I asked the manager what would he drink if he was eating dinner & he pointed to a wine—one that was the most expensive on the list….& by far.  (of course, I thought).  I was not familiar with the winery, but ordered it nonetheless.

It turned out to be a really solid, interesting, eye opening red wine, which was REALLY different from anything we had had during our visit to Corsica.  Amongst the ripe, dense fruit, there was uplifting minerality….I thought limestone!  The label said Buzzo Bunifazziu & it was from Bonifacio!

I asked the manager if he could look up the wine online to find out what grape variety was used to make this wine.  He couldn’t find too many details, but he did get an email address.  So, here we were sitting in a restaurant at 9:00pm at night & me emailing the winery to see what the grape variety was.  Not even 10 minutes went by & I got a reply…..Minestellu.  I got up & went to the front desk to ask the night manager to contact them & ask where the winery was located.  We had to catch a ferry to Sardegna the next day around 12:30pm & I was hoping there might be a chance to stop by & see them.

Thierry Buzzo replied & said he would swing by the hotel around 8:30am the next morning, take me to his vineyard & drop me back off at the hotel, all within the time restraints.  Are you kidding me, I thought?  Ok, I am game!, the wine was that good.

The next morning Thierry was right on time & off we went.  (Cheryle & Mike stayed back to do some last minute shopping & walking around the town).

The vineyard & winery was but 15 minutes away.  I realized while driving there, I would never have found it driving alone.  There are no street addresses or signs & their place is really down a pretty low keyed road & area.

I was greeted by Vincent Buzzo (Thierry’s father) & Angelica Santori (I believe the associate winemaker & a graduate of the wine school in Montpellier.  She also thankfully spoke English quite well).

 

Their winery was quite small & their estate vineyards was but 10 hectares in size.  Portions of their vineyards were hard argilo-calcaire bedrock with a thin layer of clay topsoil & other parts the topsoil was black (I surmise of volcanic origin).  Although this project was 3 generations old, they really started upping their game by planting 7 hectares in 2010 & some in 2017 to a handful of native, heirloom grapes vines–Vermentino, Barbarossa for white & Niellucciu, Sciaccarellu & Minestellu for red wines.

I was really taken by their wines.  They were not as standout-ish as those of Arena, Abbatucci or Canarelli, but they were solid, well crafted & really showcased the calcareous soils they were grown in.  I think this winery has a lot of potential & can’t wait to see what happens as their vines get older & they better understand what their vineyards want to say.  I would also add that the key to how they progress will largely be based upon the involvement of Angelica Santori & her development.  While the Buzzo’s may own the land, it was obvious Angelica was the main cog here in making things happen & their wines’ quality. 

We quickly tasted through several of their wines–

Vermentino1/2 fermented in stainless, 1/2 in 228liter barrel (1, 2 & 3 years old), 100% malolactic & 6 to 7 months on the lees.

Barbarossafermented in stainless, 5 months on the lees.

RoséSciaccarellu, Niellucciu & Vermentino–direct press, NO ML.

Niellucciu100% Niellucciu, NO stems, stainless

Minestellu100% Minestellu, NO stems, stainless

This is a winery to keep an eye on.

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