Dec
02

Corsican Wines–Part 5–Figari

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Corsica proved to be a very amazing food & wine adventure.  Driving from north to south & traversing the very mountainous island & navigating the perversely winding, narrow roads was harrowing & tiring, BUT, seeing hours upon hours of remote, seemingly untouched countryside reminded us that Corsica is thankfully not yet completely westernized, especially in the northern parts..

As we headed through the southern half, everything seemed to slowly change & the towns became bigger & more developed, the terrain flatter & the weather warmer.

After our stop at Pero Longo in Sartène, we headed to the city of Bonifacio, which would be our home base for the last 2 days on the island. 

The first morning there we headed east towards Figari (actually just outside the village of Tarabucetta) to visit another highly revered vigneron–Yves Canarelli.  Yves is another champion of native, indigenous vines–Vermentinu, Bianco Gentile, Niellucciu, Sciaccarellu, Minustellu, Genovese, Carcaghjolu Neru (& Biancu), Paga Debiti, Barbarossa, just to name a few.  (He also has small amounts of Grenache, Cinsault & Syrah planted–which may have been there before his arrival in 1993).

Interestingly, Yves grows his vines in 3 separate areas–33 hectares in Figari (granite based with red alluvial soils); Sartène (REALLY old vines grown in granitic soils) & has 5 hectares in Bonifacio (limestone base).

Canarelli is also vehemently about organic & biodynamic farming & this style of farming is greatly aided by the constant, relentless coastal winds that comes in from the Gulf of Figari. 

Upon arrival, we were blown away at how “state of the art” his winery looked.  There were many kinds of oak vessels, concrete vessels & 2 kinds of amphorae.  Yves, although very much into wild yeast fermentation & using whole cluster, is nonetheless very deliberate & precise in his winemaking & is continually tinkering with what to ferment in & how to make his wines more interesting, while still showcasing Corsican character & integrity.

Wine wise, Clos Canarelli has three main, differentiating sub-labels–

Corse FigariBlanc (Vermentino)–partial malolactic & aged in large foudres/older neutral barrels; Rosé (Sciaccarellu, Niellucciu & Grenache–for finesse)–whole cluster fermentation, direct press, partial malolactic & 100% stainless steel; & a Rouge (typically 80% Niellucciu, 15% Syrah & 5% Sciaccarellu)–100% destemmed, fermented & vinified in large foudres for 14 to 18 monthsRouge “Alta Rocca” (Sciaccarellu, single parcel planted in 1997)–typically 4 week fermentation in stainless & then aged in foudres for 24 months.

Vine de France (wines not fully adhering to the government restrictions.  I call it Yves doing his thing to make the best wines he can)–Rouge “Costa Nera” (Carcaghjolu Neru)–100% destemmed, fermented & vinified in large foudres for 14 to 18 months; Rouge “Tarra d’Orasi” typically 500 bottle production–(1/2 hectare, single vineyard–field blend–Sciaccarellu, Minustellu & Cinsault–vines, 140 years in age in Sartène )–100% destemmed, fermented & vinified in large foudres for 14 to 18 months; Blanc “Tarra d’Orasi”–typically 500 bottle production–(1/2 hectare, single parcel–typically 70% Vermentinu, 30% field blend–Genovese, Carcaghjolu Biancu, Paga Debiti & Barbarossa–vines 140 years in age in Sartène )–fermented in stainless & aged 24 months on the lees.  100% malolactic; Blanc “BG” (Biancu Gentile)–fermented on lees in concrete eggs. Blanc “Tara di Sognu” (in Bonifacio–limestone soils)–2016 100% Vermentino–barrel fermented & aged for 6 months in new, 600 liter barrels, 100% ML, 6 months on the lees (no stirring); 2017–80% Vermentino, 20% other native grape varieties–Genovese, Riminese, Biancu Gentile, 100% malolactic, 6 to 8 months on the lees (no stirring & aged in 600 liter new barrels for 6 months. Rouge “Tarra di Sognu”  (in Bonifacio–limestone soils)–2016 (50% Carcaghjolu Neru, 40% Sciaccarellu & 10% Minustellu)–NO stems, aged for 16 months  foudres & large ovals.

Corse Figari “Amphora” (wines done is amphora–one specifically for white wine & a different one for reds)–Blanc (Vermentino, planted in 1997)–2/3’s must & 1/3 whole cluster, fermented & aged in amphora for 3 months & 3 months in old barrels with no sulfur used during the vinification & bottling.  100% malolactic; Rouge (typically 80% Niellucciu, 10% Sciaccarellu & 10% native vines)–100% destemmed, fermentation in amphora for 4 to 7 weeks (no sulfur used during the vinification & bottling), aged in stainless & old oak barrels for 7 to 9 months.

Vin de France Muscat MPG–Clos Canarelli also has .7 hectares of Muscat a Petit Grains (planted in 1997)–& produces a vendange tardive, non muted sweet wine, harvested at roughly 18% potential alcohol, fermented in barrel to 15% alcohol & aged for 2 years in older oak barrels.  typically 45 grams per liter residual sugar.

The Clos Canarelli wines deliver in the “sweet” spot–they have impact & appeal, they have integrity, they are intellectual & they have class–& are therefore the rage in mainland France & also is meteorically growing in popularity amongst the sommeliers of America.

Thank you Yves for an incredible visit.

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