Jan
11

An Interview with Jordan Fiorentini (winemaker of Epoch wines)

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Here is an interview we did with Jordan Fiorentini for Wine Speak 2020.

Jordan Fiorentini is the winemaker extraordinaire for Epoch Estate Wines in Paso Robles —and she was also part of one of Wine Speak’s most defining moments, as you will see in the following interview.

Passionate, dedicated and not afraid to push the envelope, Jordan brings an enthusiastic and experienced spirit to Epoch Estate Wines. Her palate is the kind wine lovers dream of and one that speaks to Jordan through shapes—having an artistic side, Jordan now draws her tasting notes in addition to writing about each wine. Under her direction, Epoch Estate Wines has produced some of the most revered wines in Paso Robles.

Jordan holds an engineering degree from Dartmouth College and a masters degree in viticulture from UC Davis. Jordan earned her spurs working at her family’s winery in Georgia, Araujo Estate in Napa Valley, Antinori Winery in Italy, and as head winemaker at Chalk Hill in Sonoma.

Wine Speak co-founder and master sommelier Chuck Furuya recently caught up with Jordan to talk her experience at Wine Speak; her winemaking inspirations; and how she aims to keep it all in balance:

In 2019, Wine Speak featured a panel—“Wine from a different perspective”—featuring five top female wine professionals, and you were one of the panelists. Many, many participants have said it was so powerful and drew a lot of emotion out.  What made this happen?

It was a magical group of wine professionals – all with different panels. I think what made it so special was that Amanda, the moderator, started with a personal story about herself and her path in the wine industry, which made all the panelists feel like sharing about themselves. Amanda had asked us to share our stories. I also feel that the audience’s interested, smiling faces, and great engaged questions made the panel so meaningful. There was an energy that kept building with every question they had.

What was it like being a part of that?

I felt so humbled to be among a group of such accomplished, professional women in the wine industry. It showed me and hopefully everyone in the crowd that there’s not one recipe for success or becoming someone in the wine industry.

What will you take away from that experience?
I can still reflect on it now, and I am still wowed when I hear people mention the panel. I actually received several thank you notes from people in attendance who were moved by our stories. Now that doesn’t happen every day!

How do you keep it all managed/balanced—work, personal and family?

That’s a great question – do I keep a balance? It’s actually the eternal question, one I work on every day. Some days I feel I do and some days I feel I don’t. The key is having a great relationship with everyone at work so we all support each other and it’s the same at home.

Over the years who are some of the winemakers who have inspired you and why?

I gather inspiration from tasting people’s wines, hearing their stories and, most poignantly, from working or spending time with other winemakers. My first inspirations were the first winemakers I ever worked for, who continue to inspire me today: Michael Beaulac, Kim Nicholls and Franciose Pechon. They were the winemakers I worked for my first couple harvests I was in Napa. Then there is Steve Leveque from Hall (formerly Chalk Hill) who really taught me how to blend and make winemaking decisions in the vineyards and winery. More recently, I’ve traveled and been exposed to many Rhône winemakers, such as Ann Charlotte Bachas from Domaine della Font du Loup and Sara Perez from Mas Martinet, who are very different but leading the charge in their respective places.  Winemakers locally who help guide me through harvests, and who inspire and support me, are Vailia Esh of Desparada and Anthony Yount from Denner. There are others, too, but I talk to those two the most.

What were some “aha” moment wines for you and why?

In 2010, when visiting Paso to determine whether or not I wanted to move and work here, I tried L’Aventure’s 2007 Cote a Cote and thought it was so exciting with flavors I hadn’t experienced before. That wine helped me make the decision to move here. I have many other transcendent moments with wine, but the one described above actually helped me make a life decision!

What was an “aha” wine and food moment for you and why?

Randy Caparoso’s pairing of our 2017 Epoch White as the main course after several reds with an incredible duck pasta dish by Sean from the Range—this was at the last Wine Speak!

What advice would you give to your younger self?

That there isn’t one recipe to be successful in the wine industry. Now that I look back and see so many successful winemakers that came from different backgrounds, different approaches, I realize this industry is even more creative than I originally thought (and I got into it because I wanted a field that allowed creativity!).

What is it about Paso Robles that really intrigues you as a winemaker?

The community and sense that we’re in this together in winemaking and grape growing. Because you feel others have your back, you’re more willing to research, explore, take chances. And then you’ve got an audience to share those experiences with. It’s truly one of a kind.

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