Feb
09

A Quartet of Other German White Wines

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Of the top ten standout wines of all time to me, I would say at least four were German Rieslings. Each of these wines displayed such incredible pedigree, filagree and innate breed that was truly mesmerizing, captivating and memorable to me. Germany has produced some of the world’s finest riesling based wines and over the years, but was lucky if they produced two or three vintages out of every decade, that’s how marginal of a growing region it was.   What the German government decided to do then, was create vine crosses, which would ideally feature Riesling’s innate nobility, BUT would ripen earlier. The two most successful were Scheurebe and Müller-Thurgau, each named after the doctor that created them. Since 1988, these conditions have greatly changed because of global warming, we now essentially have a ripe vintage every year in Germany, so now Scheurebe and Müller-Thurgau are now shrinking in popularity and, therefore acreage planted. Over all of the years, both of these grape varieties and Silvaner were considered inferior to the all mighty Riesling and were more often used in less expensive, regional blends and planted mainly for cash flow. I would say there are four noteworthy renditions, which rise above the norm AND provide something unique and wonderfully food friendly. Here is your chance to better understand what these “ugly duckling” grape varieties are capable of. 

2016 Rudolf Fürst Müller-Thurgau “Pur Mineral”–Without a doubt the finest Müller-Thurgau in the world is grown and produced by Paul Fürst, a former “Gault Millau Winemaker of the Year” in Franconia, Germany. Paul has .75 hectare planted in red sandstone soils of his home turf in Bürgstadt.   The wine perennially displays riveting purity and class with seamless flow and texture and a very sophisticated air to it. It is also wonderfully food friendly. They deftly show us what this grape variety can truly be.

 

2015 Hans Wirsching Silvaner DRY Erste Lage “Iphöfer Kalb”–Also from Franconia, Germany is the house of Hans Wirsching, a 14 generation run family winery, who is also a former “Gault Millau Winery of the Year”. We learned quite some time ago, while the Silvaner grape variety is certainly NOT of Grand Cru quality, it has a remarkable pliability which makes it work magic with a wide range of foods. Well, this is one of the very finest examples of what this grape variety can be. FYI—the Erste Lage designation is Germany’s attempt at establishing a Grand Cru/Premier Cru hierarchy.

 

2014 Hans Wirsching Scheurebe Kabinett DRY “Iphöfer”–For me, it should get a 100 point score for how incredibly food friendly it is and quietly so.   This comes from another truly iconic estate and this for me, is their crown jewel. It is not because it has Grand Cru potential, but much more about how incredibly tasty and wonderfully food friendly it typically is. I really think this wine should be on most top end restaurants’ winelist for that very reason.

 

2017 Müller-Catoir Scheurebe DRY–This is the same Scheurebe grape variety BUT ramped up a few notches. Müller-Catoir is regarded as one of the top German wine estates for at least two decades. While they get high praise and accolades for their Riesling bottlings, they also have been considered the master of the Scheurebe grape variety for some time. I remember eating at Emeril’s Restaurant in New Orleans and being served Müller-Catoir Scheurebe Spätlese by their wine director blind paired with a duck course. It had the exotic fruit and spiciness of gewurztraminer but much more civilized, earth driven and focused. The pairing proved to be one of the most memorable of all time for me. Fast forwarding to today, here is a DRY version from 2017, exotically aromatic and lots of potential with contemporary fusion fowl, foie gras and meat dishes. At least, it is an opportunity to taste this seldomly seen discovery.

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