Apr
21

A Couple of Interesting Wines from Neyers

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One of the most tantalizing facets of wine I have appreciated over the years is the synergy created by planting the right vines in the right terroir.  Especially in the skillful hands of a masterful winemaker, this can  create a much more interesting, intriguing wine.

Napa BerryAs the venerable Andre Ostertag would say, a vin de terroir rather than a vin de climat or a  vin de fruits.

California has an abundance of vin de fruits & vin de climats.  No judgements here, that’s just the way it is.

It is, therefore, quite a thrill to find wines from California which can marry the soil & the grape variety & then create oenological magic.

Such is the case at Neyers.

The Neyers 304 Chardonnay bottling, for instance,  is a blend of Shot Wente, a heritage selection, planted in parcels of rocky soils.  Neyers 304The resulting wine truly has the unique aromatics of the Shot Wente & just as important……. the stones, which makes for a far more interesting wine than those that  just showcase Chardonnay fruitiness, clonal or otherwise.

In addition,  the stoniness/minerality really adds to the buoyancy of the wine, making it seem lighter than it really is.  We truly love this naturally lower alcohol, mineral driven, crisp, complete Chardonnay & find it ideal to serve by the glass, because of how delicious, light & much more food friendly it is.

Another stellar, interesting Neyers wine to offer by the glass is their Sage Canyon Cuvee.  Neyers sageThe base is Carignane & Mourvedre from 130 plus year old vines out near Oakley, with some Grenache & Syrah added in. This wine is foot stomped, wild yeast fermented & bottled unfiltered & unfined.

One could say, this is a homage to the wines of Maxime Magnon, a standout winemaking renegade down in southern France, who is really championing the Carignane grape variety AND a very, almost radical, au naturale approach to grape growing & winemaking..

In both cases, the wines are certainly interesting & provocative, but at least equally as important, they are delicious.  Now, if we expect the foods we serve to be delicious, shouldn’t the wines we serve by the glass be delicious too?  And, tonight…..not 20 to 40 years down the road?

Yes, these are 2 wines I would definitely order at a restaurant who was serving them by the glass.

In addition, as a professional, I also believe it is important to support these kinds of projects—those who believe in heirloom/heritage grape vines, which are farmed sustainably & thereby having a “living” vineyard.

And if the BATF ever required a disclosure back label, the Neyers’ very short list would only include the grapes used & perhaps a tiny bit of sulfur before bottling.  How pure is that?

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